Monday, 11 December 2017

Zimbabwe; Where are our Human Rights?

Today [10th December 2017] is International Human Rights Day. Zimbabwe is on record for being one of the countries that violate human rights to settle political scores. Very little is done to educate Zimbabwean citizens on Human Rights with some ignorantly professing that Human Rights is a western concept.
Linda Looking for real Independence

Human rights are claims that every human being is entitled to in order to live a dignified life. In Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights it states that, "ALL HUMAN BEINGS ARE BORN FREE AND EQUAL IN DIGNITY AND RIGHTS."

Every Zimbabwean has the right to a dignified life, should have equal access to resources, opportunities and services essential for an adequate standard of living. It's rather unfortunate that most in Zimbabwe, a large percentage of the population lives in poverty and social deprivation which has led to many people normalizing the abnormal and accepting violation of rights as a way of life.
Economic, Social and cultural rights are human rights and should ensure pro-poor, inclusive and sustainable development. These rights were not considered at all in the preparation of the 2019 budget which was presented on Friday. The budget was more of a market economy with very little connotations to social justice.

The very few Zimbabweans still employed deserve a living wage and decent working conditions. In the budget statement it was stated that, technically insolvent parastatals will be closed. What happens when the parastatals are closed as there was no budget presented for their packages. Two years down the line Zuva judgement victims are still wrong for their terminal benefits and retirement packages with most of them now living in abject poverty. Former workers of the same parastatals who had their contract of employment terminated by the infamous zuva judgement are struggling to make ends meet. There are no jobs and those who had resorted to vending to sustain their livelihoods are being chased off the streets which has made life generally unbearable and miserable for the unemployed.
The African Charter on Human and People's Rights safeguards the following rights;

  1. Right to work (article 15)
  2. Right to health (Article 16)
  3. Right to Education (Article 17)

Zimbabwe signed this charter on 28 February 1986 and ratified it on 30 August 1986.
The right to health care is essential for one to fully enjoy their right to health. Healthcare must be accessible, available, acceptable and of good quality. Zimbabwe has failed to provide adequate healthcare for the past twenty years in public hospitals which is a gross violation of human rights and their obligation in relation to Article 1 of the African Charter which requires State parties to "recognize" the rights, duties and freedoms enshrined in the charter.

Hundreds die prematurely in our government hospitals due to shortage of critical drugs, shortage of blood, malfunctioning machinery and poor Healthcare. It is our responsibility as active citizens to continue demanding accountability until every Zimbabwean enjoys the right to quality healthcare.
The right to education is a Human Rights on its own. It is a guarantee of being entitled to education that us accessible, affordable and available to everyone. The right to education as enshrined in section 75 of the constitution of Zimbabwe is a fundamental human right necessary for every person to know and be able to demand and assert other human rights. Section 75 further states that in clause 1(a) every citizen and permanent resident of Zimbabwe has a right to a basic state funded education, including adult basic education...

Government must pay for basic education and efforts should be made to ensure that all the children gallivanting in the streets are afforded the opportunity to go to school. All children who have been sent away from school should go back to school and those who are engaged in child prostitution and drug abuse should be rehabilitated and taken back to school.
These provisions in the constitution show some of the commitments made by government when if accepted these Human rights instruments such as the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural rights.

In conclusion, our right to health is greatly compromised by the dirty, filthy and condemned water that comes out our taps which is a violation of our right to safe, clean and potable water as enshrined in section 77 of the constitution of Zimbabwe. Water is very important for a healthy life. No one can exercise other rights if they do not have right to water. Every Zimbabwean must access clean and safe drinking water and sanitation.

The United Nations also passed a resolution in 2010 recognizing that water and sanitation is a Human right. The government of Zimbabwe has an obligation to provide clean, safe and portable water to every Zimbabwean and must respect the right to water, protect the right to water and the central government and local authorities have a duty to provide clean and portable water in Zimbabwe. Our duty as Zimbabweans is to demand basic human rights to be adhered to. First things first the right to water.

Let us be active citizens and demand our fundamental human rights to be respected and protected.

Linda Tsungirirai Masarira
Human Rights Defender, Aspiring MP Harare Central, Political Activist and Founder & National Coordinator of Zimbabwe Women in Politics Alliance

Thursday, 7 December 2017

Is Zimbabwe to become a Democracy?

All Zimbabweans are optimistic that we are heading for a new beginning. So now that we are sober after celebrating Mugabe’s departure, should we now say we are in a new Zimbabwe?
Military Rule looks to remain

What normally guides a new beginning is the prescription provided by the new comers in their manifesto. The manifesto then becomes a yardstick of measuring the progress. Here we do not have that luxury, so far,  we are guessing aided by the new president’s inauguration speech, press releases and announcements.

However we must point out that Emmerson Mnanagwa’s coronation has come at a very high cost for the nation. That of shredding the constitution, that which guides a nation,

Was the constitution shredded so that we can get a fresh start
before the elections?

The Zimbabweans aspirations after the success of the forceful removal of Robert Mugabe is to establish a completely new leadership and a new political system that is entirely based on the constitution, open, free and fair elections. So far there is no script that is Consistent with these new expectations other than the fact that the elections will go ahead as scheduled.

Whilst it is important that elections are held as per scheduled, it now seems to be the only way of pushing the armed forces out of the political scene. The 2018 elections could thus expedite the return of the soldiers to their barracks. The armed forces should focus on defending the country. In addition, moving forward with the elections would allow the elected government to address the social and economic crisis.

After independence, the military was made up of the ex Rhodesian Front soldiers, and ZANU and ZAPU military wings -ZANLA and ZIPRA - which created a professional Zimbabwe National Army (ZNA). For many, the ZNA had a professional image which at the time was rare in Africa. It was seen to possess professionalism rare in African armies and was not likely to interfere in politics accept in upholding the Zimbabwean constitution. It argued that it is this professionalism that prompted the Zanu PF regime to create the fifth brigade whose unrestrained approach to Gukurahundi left many people dead.

Unlike the army, it was the Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP) and the Central Intelligent Organisation (CIO) who were the political instruments of ZANU PF.

Far from it, since Zimbabwe’s Independence in 1980, the whole of the security sector, particularly the ZNA, has waded into the country’s political affairs, shredding their constitutional mandate to pieces and turning themselves into kingmakers.

Therefore this transitional process will benefit Zanu-PF leaving the MDC out in the cold at the expense of democracy. This is an issue of concern because we do not have a national framework guiding our nation right now.

Zimbabwe’s supreme law as well as the Defence Forces Act prohibit the ZNA from participating in partisan politics or interfering in electoral affairs.

The Zimbabwe Human Rights Organisation (ZHRO) notes with concern that this aspect of the constitution makes the army’s involvement counter the democratic principle that it is meant to uphold.

The shredding of the 2013 constitution - which was strongly endorsed by the people of Zimbabwe - will have terrible, if not horrific consequences for all of us. 

The guiding ideology that shapes the Zimbabwe military is that of nationalism dating back to the time of the liberation struggle. Within the patriotic history, liberation war credentials become the source and qualification for anyone to occupy political office in Zimbabwe. The current situation cascades from this liberation war tradition, thereby the glorification of Mnanagwa as the leader of the state, who is also the commander in chief of the armed forces is inculcated on the military.

“Let bygones be bygones” said Mnangagwa - yet we cannot afford to forget that the Zimbabwean military has played an active role in violent post colonial practices. What emerges poignantly from this coup is that within the top leadership of the military, there is a deliberate conflation of loyalty to Zanu PF and individuals loyalty to President Mnangagwa.

Zimbabwe’s laws including the Defence Forces Act and the Constitution prohibit the military from participating in politics and from partisan interference in electoral affairs. The mission statement and objectives of the Zimbabwe Defence Forces clearly spell out what the army and other forces seek to achieve, which includes ensuring the protection and security of Zimbabwe’s territorial integrity and independence.

Notwithstanding the legal and formal prohibition of partisan political conduct by the army, the military leadership is openly partisan towards ZANU- PF and has dabbled in politics on several occasions thereby straining relations with civilians.

The civil society and military relations were eroded to being non-existent in 2002 when the military chiefs purported to set the criteria for persons who can be presidential candidates. Since 2002, the military has consistently threatened to veto any poll result that goes against its then preferred candidate -Robert Mugabe.

At this week’s ZHRO Wednesday Vigil, members waves placards - pushing for a Diaspora vote - Electoral reforms - explanation on the whereabouts of the missing activists and calling on the new president to show commitment on at least apologise and name all the Gukurahundi victims.

All Zimbabweans are optimistic that we are heading for a new beginning. So now that we are sober after celebrating Mugabe’s departure, should we now say we are in a new Zimbabwe?

What normally guides a new beginning is the prescription provided by the new comers in their manifesto. The manifesto then becomes a yardstick of measuring the progress. Here we do not have that luxury, so far,  we are guessing aided by the new president’s inauguration speech, press releases and announcements.

However we must point out that Emmerson Mnanagwa’s coronation has come at a very high cost for the nation. That of shredding the constitution, that which guides a nation,

Was the constitution shredded so that we can get a fresh start
before the elections?

The Zimbabweans aspirations after the success of the forceful removal of Robert Mugabe is to establish a completely new leadership and a new political system that is entirely based on the constitution, open, free and fair elections. So far there is no script that is Consistent with these new expectations other than the fact that the elections will go ahead as scheduled.

Whilst it is important that elections are held as per scheduled, it now seems to be the only way of pushing the armed forces out of the political scene. The 2018 elections could thus expedite the return of the soldiers to their barracks. The armed forces should focus on defending the country. In addition, moving forward with the elections would allow the elected government to address the social and economic crisis.

After independence, the military was made up of the ex Rhodesian Front soldiers, and ZANU and ZAPU military wings -ZANLA and ZIPRA - which created a professional Zimbabwe National Army (ZNA). For many, the ZNA had a professional image which at the time was rare in Africa. It was seen to possess professionalism rare in African armies and was not likely to interfere in politics accept in upholding the Zimbabwean constitution. It argued that it is this professionalism that prompted the Zanu PF regime to create the fifth brigade whose unrestrained approach to Gukurahundi left many people dead.

Unlike the army, it was the Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP) and the Central Intelligent Organisation (CIO) who were the political instruments of ZANU PF.

Far from it, since Zimbabwe’s Independence in 1980, the whole of the security sector, particularly the ZNA, has waded into the country’s political affairs, shredding their constitutional mandate to pieces and turning themselves into kingmakers.

Therefore this transitional process will benefit Zanu-PF leaving the MDC out in the cold at the expense of democracy. This is an issue of concern because we do not have a national framework guiding our nation right now.

Zimbabwe’s supreme law as well as the Defence Forces Act prohibit the ZNA from participating in partisan politics or interfering in electoral affairs.

The Zimbabwe Human Rights Organisation (ZHRO) notes with concern that this aspect of the constitution makes the army’s involvement counter the democratic principle that it is meant to uphold.

The shredding of the 2013 constitution - which was strongly endorsed by the people of Zimbabwe - will have terrible, if not horrific consequences for all of us. 

“We have not been singing - ‘Mugabe must go’- meaning Mugabe the person - but we want the whole ZANU-PF system whose leadership was Mugabe and his cronies to go - In as far as we are concerned only Mugabe the person has gone but the whole ZANU-PF system is still intact and is now being led by the one who was deputy dictator - Emmerson (The crocodile) Mnangagwa - who has been Mugabe's right hand man for more than 50 years. The whole system must go” - said one protester

The guiding ideology that shapes the Zimbabwe military is that of nationalism dating back to the time of the liberation struggle. Within the patriotic history, liberation war credentials become the source and qualification for anyone to occupy political office in Zimbabwe. The current situation cascades from this liberation war tradition, thereby the glorification of Mnanagwa as the leader of the state, who is also the commander in chief of the armed forces is inculcated on the military.

“Let bygones be bygones” said Mnangagwa - yet we cannot afford to forget that the Zimbabwean military has played an active role in violent post colonial practices. What emerges poignantly from this coup is that within the top leadership of the military, there is a deliberate conflation of loyalty to Zanu PF and individuals loyalty to President Mnangagwa.

Zimbabwe’s laws including the Defence Forces Act and the Constitution prohibit the military from participating in politics and from partisan interference in electoral affairs. The mission statement and objectives of the Zimbabwe Defence Forces clearly spell out what the army and other forces seek to achieve, which includes ensuring the protection and security of Zimbabwe’s territorial integrity and independence.

Notwithstanding the legal and formal prohibition of partisan political conduct by the army, the military leadership is openly partisan towards ZANU- PF and has dabbled in politics on several occasions thereby straining relations with civilians.

The civil society and military relations were eroded to being non-existent in 2002 when the military chiefs purported to set the criteria for persons who can be presidential candidates. Since 2002, the military has consistently threatened to veto any poll result that goes against its then preferred candidate -Robert Mugabe.

At this week’s ZHRO Wednesday Vigil, members waves placards - pushing for a Diaspora vote - Electoral reforms - explanation on the whereabouts of the missing activists and calling on the new president to show commitment on at least apologise and name all the Gukurahundi victims.

These extremely partisan political statements by the military are a subversion of the will of the people and a vitiation of elections as an expression of democratic choice. Defence Forces Commander, Constantine Chiwenga, in a manner that could unduly influence elections, has publicly predicted resounding electoral victory for ZANU-PF presidential candidate, Robert Mugabe in the past.

If Zimbabwe - under the Presidency of Mnanagwa - is to genuinely prepare for open elections that are free and fair, and where violence or intimidation play no part, then reform and transformation of the ZNA, and other security sector branches is of paramount importance.

ZHRO urges the Southern African Development Community (SADC) to urgently engage the ZNA with a view to restore professionalism, independence and non partisanship to the military and to completely divorce the military from all political interference.

These extremely partisan political statements by the military are a subversion of the will of the people and a vitiation of elections as an expression of democratic choice. Defence Forces Commander, Constantine Chiwenga, in a manner that could unduly influence elections, has publicly predicted resounding electoral victory for ZANU-PF presidential candidate, Robert Mugabe in the past.

If Zimbabwe - under the Presidency of Mnanagwa - is to genuinely prepare for open elections that are free and fair, and where violence or intimidation play no part, then reform and transformation of the ZNA, and other security sector branches is of paramount importance.

ZHRO urges the Southern African Development Community (SADC) to urgently engage the ZNA with a view to restore professionalism, independence and non partisanship to the military and to completely divorce the military from all political interference.

Mnangagwa will always be associated with all the darkest times of Zimbabwean history - especially Gukurahundi and the 2002 and 2008 Electoral violence

Monday, 30 October 2017

The poor State of Health in Zimbabwe's Hospitals

By Vimbai Chambara

The World Health Organization announced that Robert Mugabe would be the organisation's Goodwill Ambassador , a role reserved to those who have made much contribution to their communities and have the respect of those the people they will represent. I am curious that after much debate the honour was stripped from Mugabe however, how was this honour bestowed on him in the first place?  His regime have continuously creamed the vulnerable and in their hour of need push them into further despair as they watch loved one die due to raising costs of health care provision in Zimbabwe.

 Surely, Mugabe cannot ignore his governments’ failings to meet the health needs of his people. The regime boasts that Zimbabwe’s public health system provides health care services which are complemented by Mission hospitals and health care services supported by non-governmental organizations (NGOs). However, in recent years, economic decline and political instability have led to a reduction in health-care budgets, affecting provision at all levels.  The country’s health care sector has faced a shortage of professional staff, poor equipped hospitals, lack of medication and an erosion of the infrastructure of hospital infrastructure. Humanitarian crisis including HIV, cholera and measles epidemics, as well as poor services for children have exacerbated the breakdown of the medical response to the nation’s needs.
The state of Zimbabwe's Hospitals is very poor

Government run Harare, Mpilo and Parirenyatwa Hospital all face this dilemma brought about by political instability and chaos in the management of the health care system under Mugabe's watch. Vulnerable Zimbabweans  have witnessed services deteriorate further as the government failed to provide much needed substantial financial support to the health care system and introduced user fees for health care.

Health care services at public and private hospitals are a biased lottery system where those with money can afford treatment. These fees varying from provider to provider, a financial burden  and barrier for the most vulnerable citizens of Zimbabwe to access the most basic health services. A shocking example is that giving birth at a government hospital can cost up to USD 50 and 39 % of women are option to take risks and have their child at home without medical provision. Examining the current state and crisis of the health care services in Zimbabwe, how does the WHO insult vulnerable people in Zimbabwe by recognising Mugabe as a leader in promoting health? A man when employs poor strategies, inadequate polices and management putting every Zimbabwe at risk of imminent death due poor health care provision.

Sunday, 15 October 2017

What is Activsm?

ac·tiv·ism  (ăk′tə-vĭz′əm)
noun.
The use of direct, often confrontational action, such as a demonstration or strike, in opposition to or support of a cause.

activism (ˈæktɪˌvɪzəm)
noun
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a policy of taking direct and often militant action to achieve an end, esp a political or social one
ˈactivist - noun
Lest we forget what activism is about, a couple of dictionary definitions of ACTIVISM.

Zimbabweans entering theior own Embassy to protest
For those in Zimbabwe few are happy with the state of affairs in the economy, or for any form of opposition to the dictates on an illegal "Government" [ a Zanu PF regime masquerading as a Government when they are in fact a military junta, whose sole purpose is to remain in power so they can continue to loot every facet of the wealth of Zimbabwe].

For those who have been forced to flee Zimbabwe, activism is one method to secure change. For those in Zimbabwe Activism can be a death sentence - those who tread this path do so very carefully.

The illegal Government of Zimbabwe has recently appointed a failed Finance Minister to head a Cyber Security, Threat Detection, and Mitigation Ministry.

Law expert, Alex Magaisa, said this week that “But more ominously creating a standalone Ministry to monitor cyberspace also shows Mugabe's penchant for expanding instruments of coercion as opposed to protection of fundamental freedoms. Chinamasa's new role should send alarm bells ringing in both civil society and the opposition. The hand of state repression is only getting stronger and Chinamasa will try to justify the relevance of his new role..”

“People have been making jokes about this ministry but I see serious threat to freedom of expression, access to information and the right to privacy,” said Chris Musodza, an ICT expert based in Harare. “We now have a ministry dedicated to surveillance and monitoring of the cyberspace.”
Clearly the 'state apparatus' will do its utmost to stamp out opposition, or the means of communication - which will subvert their own domination of 'traditional' media channels.

“People shouldn't be afraid of their government. Governments should be afraid of their people.” Alan Moore
This should be the state of affairs for all Governments, but alas most will fail this test, and those like Zimbabwe are working from the other end of this scale [of natural justice]. So for a band of Zimbabweans to walk into their own embassy to challenge the the evil regime and its state apparatus IS activism, it is a symbolic act. - To change perception, to challenge a nation so cowed by a dictator, that the removal of his portrait from the wall of the Embassy is actually seen as treason - ironically and most telling, tragically the same dictator responsible [but as yet unpunished] for the genocide known as Gukurahundi, but also torture, rape, abductions, murder to the present day. 

Their motto has to be "voters need to be afraid of what we will do if you do not vote Zanu PF back into their comfort zone of looting and elitism"
The Zanu PF junta rules Zimbabwe, with an iron fist in an iron glove, and with iron Jack Boots. Their position as a purported "democratically elected Government" [sic] has to be challenged, not just by Zimbabweans, but by the rest of the World. Zanu PF are a criminal cabal, with much more in common with a terrorist organisation than the rest of the World should tolerate.





Saturday, 16 September 2017

Do We Celebrate International Day of Democracy in Zimbabwe?

By Pythias Makonese

Friday 15th September 2017 is International Day of Democracy whereby we should be found promoting the need to strengthen democratic means world-wide including Zimbabwe. This would promote peace and stability.

It’s a shame we have never celebrated this day for the past 10 years in Zimbabwe just maybe we know we are not a democratic nation.

Various activities and events are held around  the world to promote democracy on this day. These events could include key speakers such as political leaders heavily involved in supporting and endorsing democratic governments and communities.

The United Nations (UN) general assembly decided on November 8, 2007, to mark 15th as the annual  date to observe the International Day of Democracy and this was first celebrated in 2008.
The main goal and belief is that human rights and the rule of law are best protected in democratic societies backed by the product of a strong active and vocal civil society.

In its simplest terms democracy is the belief in freedom and equality between people, or a system of government based on this belief, in which power is either held by elected representatives or directly by the people themselves.

Is this what we having in Zimbabwe?.

General elections are  a way of showing that a country is democratic one.  Although we have elections in Zimbabwe we are not yet a democratic country. We hide behind a finger. We cannot talk confidently when we have had the same President for the past 37 years suffering from corruption which paralyzed our economy and have severely tarnished our international reputation.Citizens have been made to disappear for being critical to the government, some have lost their lives and many others have scars of violence.

To be honest Zimbabwe is an undemocratic country ruled by a 93 year old autocratic   president - who still want to contest for another term in office in the forth coming 2018 elections. He gives lip service to the wishes of the people who are forced to elect him. If he loses, elections results go unannounced for some time like those of 2008 where later  people were asked whom they had voted for and if suspected to belong to the opposition were victimised.

We live under a regime which qualifies to be described as authoritarian, oppressive and undemocratic. The majority of the citizens are not enjoying the benefits of good governance.

Are we not envying Mauritius which was awarded full democracy status and a quiet achiever with strong rule of law?


Freedom House, in its 2016 Freedom in the World report named Nigeria, Liberia and Ivory Coast among the countries with the biggest improvements in political rights and civil liberties. History was made in Nigeria in 2015 when an opposition party gained power through elections. How far are we from that in Zimbabwe when we have army commanders  who vow not to work under an opposition leader if he wins. Also threats of going back to war are uttered by our leaders.

Botswana, Ghana, Cape Verde and Benin have also been lauded as democratic examples.
Many African countries - almost 20 including Zimbabwe are holding presidential elections but this does not automatically lead to truly representative governments portraying the will of the people.
In Zimbabwe  and other parts of Africa, we have authoritarian leadership which has maintained an iron grip on power either by amending  laws so as to extend their terms of office, hosting rubber stamp elections or repressing opposition and civil society.

How can we enjoy democracy when we have someone who has been in office for almost four decades and as if it's not enough is busy preparing for the wife to take over.

If  our First Lady, Grace Mugabe, can follow suit Liberia’s Ellen Johnson Sirleaf who became Africa’s first democratically elected female head of state - no one  will complain. Also the likes of  Joyce Banda, in Malawi Ameenah Gurib -Fakin in Mauritius are good examples. Let's also learn lessons from Tanzania’s Benjamin Mkapa who called for a new, homegrown democracy. He blamed colonialists that they did not prepare Africans for self -democratic rule. Shall we blame the British for that in our case?

At the moment people are encouraged to go and register in preparations for elections. This can be the first point as proof of democracy. But how many times have we been voting in Zimbabwe producing results which keeps the same leader in power. Is it truly a reflection of our will - choosing a system of government that respects the separation of powers, fundamental freedoms of thought, religion, expression, association and assembly?

Above all do we have Rule of Law?

In Zimbabwe, ZANU-PF leadership has long back lost its democratic legitimacy since they are not able to meet the people’s will/needs such as basic services which should be provided to the citizens who are purported  to have elected the ruling party. Citizens, after elections, should be rendered good governance as a safety measure and rule of law should prevail - participation by citizens and respect for human rights, sustainable economic opportunity and human development should be major targets.
It is surprising in Zimbabwe when we had a landslide victory for 2013 but no good returns for the majority of the people who are said to have voted the government in power. Could we say that this was a sign of a country freely giving a vote of approval to a popular leader, or a sign of coercion? Companies were closed and many become jobless and unemployment is more than 80%.

Lack of democracy is usually followed by incumbent leaders who feel threatened by opponents and incite protests.On record Kenya had a case of electoral violence in 2007 which left 1 133 people dead, 600 000 people displaced and involved a wave of sexual violence.

In conclusion I would like to say that a very strong opposition is a very good recipe for existence of a healthy democracy and there cannot be true democracy without reform of the electoral system. As we move towards our 2018 elections this should mark the next step in Zimbabwe’s progress towards democracy.

I strongly therefore urge the incoming 2018 government to uphold all principles of democracy as it should take part in celebrating this day - International Day of Democracy and in addition together with International Day of Peace.

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

In Support of the 105 km Walk

By Pythias Makonese

"I do hereby support the 105 km walk having in mind that Zimbabwe is infested with corruption."

The distance covered converted to mm is more than the wrongs committed by Robert Mugabe & his ZANU-PF regime to the Zimbabwean citizens and the outside world at large. Just to mention a few examples are the following:-

  • 2014 Mega salaries saga where the Premier Service Medical Aid Society (PSMAS) was paying more than US$1.1 million per month to 14 of its Executives
  • Marange-Chiadzwa diamond looting.
  • The Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation (ZBC) “salarygate” scandal implicated the top management in mega salaries and packages.
  • Public officials demanding bribes for basic services like installing an electric metre, approving a house plan to facilitate investment.
  • Police roadblocks - money is taken from motorists for fake crimes.
  • Most corrupt institutions are the police, local councils, the vehicle inspection department - issuing driving licenses and the education department.

"This walk should raise awareness of the damaging effects of corruption."

Endemic corruption is one reason foreign companies are hesitant to invest in the country. The government lacks accountability and transparency derive from the failure of the state to prosecute and incarcerate the people involved.
Pythias an Activist

The Prevention Corruption Act (PCA) criminalizes active and passive bribery, extortion, money laundering in the public and private sectors but this seems to be selective to Robert Mugabe and his ZANU-PF regime.

Among state - owned enterprises, corruption is rife and senior executives award themselves exorbitant salaries. Irregular payments or bribes in connection with awarding of public contracts or licences are common, favouritism in the decision of of government officials are common and public funds are often diverted.

Across all sectors, corruption is a very high risk for companies operating in Zimbabwe. Investors face both high level corruption in the form of nepotism, patronage and abuse of power, as well as petty bribery and extortion.

"This walk must be a resounding warning as it brings signals to the end of the despotic regime."

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

TO ALL PEACE LOVING ZIMBABWEANS

By Ebson Chigwedere

The only way we'll get freedom for ourselves is to identify ourselves with:

  • Every oppressed soul in Zimbabwe.
  • Every progressive and peace loving Zimbabwean and
  • the long suffering and voiceless Zimbabweans.

There is no freedom of speech and expression, freedom of assembly and association. If the freedom of speech is taken away then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter. I cry for freedom from fear in Zimbabwe. It always seems impossible until it’s done. We shall see real freedom in Zimbabwe. For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.


When injustice becomes law, rebellion becomes my duty. 

Each time I stand up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, I send forth a tiny ripple of hope...building a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance in Zimbabwe. 

Zimbabwe, with its institutions, belongs to her people. Whenever we grow weary of the government, we should not be denied to exercise our constitutional right. We demand a fair electoral field before and during the 2018 harmonised elections in Zimbabwe. 

Someone should tell President Mugabe that the vast of Zimbabweans want free and fair elections. I am making these statements because of my love for democracy and my love for Zimbabwe. I am making a stand for human rights in Zimbabwe. The Human Rights Act protects ordinary people’s freedom, safety and dignity, and helps us hold authorities to account when things go wrong. But now it's under threat in Zimbabwe. I am standing up for the Human Rights Act.

I call for free and fair elections in Zimbabwe. 


“Violence is impractical because it is a descending spiral ending in destruction for all." 
 "It is immoral because it seeks to humiliate the opponent rather than win his understanding: it seeks to annihilate rather than convert. Violence is immoral because it thrives on hatred rather than love. It destroys community and makes brotherhood impossible. It leaves society in monologue rather than dialogue. Violence ends up defeating itself. It creates bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers.”
To be patriotic is to be able to question government policy in times of crisis. To be patriotic is to stand up for Human Rights and the Constitution in times of uncertainty and insecurity. To be patriotic is to speak up against the powerful in defence of the weak and the voiceless. To be patriotic is to be willing to pay the price to preserve our freedoms, dignity, and rights. To be patriotic is to challenge the abuses